The Project feature story: dingoes

Australia’s ‘native dog’ has a bad reputation, with farmers long having problems with their attacks on livestock. But some farmers are now finding a dingo-friendly approach is gaining better results.

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Farmers, conservationists and ecologists re-think Australia’s approach to dingoes on Channel Ten’s The Project.

In this 3-minute feature story on Channel Ten’s The Project, I add my voice to the dingo debate; how culling and baiting have been unsuccessful strategies, and why maintaining apex predators adds balance to our ecosystems.

Watch online at Tenplay

3 thoughts on “The Project feature story: dingoes

  1. Cheryl Bryant

    If baiting was effective why is it that pastoralists are claiming there are more wild dogs and dingoes than ever before? If something doesn’t work you look for alternatives, not continue the same methods, it is comparable to walking around in circles, you end up where you began. It is time farmers listened to the plethora of research, stop poisoning and started thinking outside the box.

  2. Marilyn Nuske

    CAMPAIGN TO REMOVE 1080 USE. I am running a Campaign in an endeavour to have 1080 removed from use in Australia, to start in all urban areas. I am keen to hear from people who have lost a pet or animal as a consequence of 1080 ingestion. I need to have your story, your experience and a description of how it affected your pet/animal. Videos are a bonus. Please can you write to me at marilyn@oceanlegal.com.au I am the Legal Advisor to Save Fraser Island Dingoes Inc and a Victorian Solicitor in Private Practice. I have watched with considerable dismay as the use is not diminishing, and is now in fact escalating with groups and individuals standing by talking about it but few doing anything proactive to prevent it. There are many other ways of people addressing pest control without using 1080, a dangerous and repulsive poison. Petitions are helpful to register protest, but many aren’t even conforming and will never even hit Parliament. Something must be done to protect animals from suffering a disgusting death, and potentially humans as 1080 has even turned up in suburban backyards following aeriel baiting. Foxes will carry 1080 for up to 1K. There have been human deaths recorded from 1080 ingestion and we must stop the use of 1080 before a child is killed it.
    Marilyn Nuske OCEAN LEGAL marilyn@oceanlegal.com.au

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