Tag Archives: national parks

The Conversation: Making national parks truly national

Australia boasts over 500 national parks covering 28 million hectares of land, or about 3.6% of Australia. You could be forgiven for thinking we’re doing well in the biodiversity-conservation game.

But did you know that of those more than 500 national parks, only six are managed by the Commonwealth Government?

Kakadu National Park – our biggest and possibly most important national park – is a global conservation embarrassment. Image by Cgoodwin [CC-BY-3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

Kakadu National Park – our biggest and possibly most important national park – is a global conservation embarrassment. Image by Cgoodwin [CC-BY-3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

Federal Environment Minister Tony Burke has proposed extending the Commonwealth’s power to veto potentially high-impact activities like logging, grazing and mining proposed in national parks.

As ecologists and conservation scientists, we couldn’t agree more with the intent of this proposal, although we have several recommendations and caveats.

Read more at The Conversation.

The Wire: Australia’s National Parks under threat

Experts are warning Australia’s National Parks are facing a ‘death by a thousand cuts’. As protections against grazing, hunting and logging within the parks relax, we are at risk of finding out first-hand just how fragile these eco-systems are, and why they desperately need protecting.

Professor Bill Laurance and I speak to The Wire’s Graham Backhaus.

via The Wire

The Conversation: Our national parks must be more than playgrounds or paddocks

Kakadu National Park. Image: Thomas Schoch [CC-BY-SA-2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

Kakadu National Park. Image: Thomas Schoch [CC-BY-SA-2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

It’s make or break time for Australia’s national parks.

National parks on land and in the ocean are dying a death of a thousand cuts, in the form of bullets, hooks, hotels, logging concessions and grazing licences. It’s been an extraordinary last few months, with various governments in eastern states proposing new uses for these critically important areas.

Read more at The Conversation